Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Experiencing Magic: Introduction & Research Question-Methodology

Introduction

The 25 Best-Loved Children’s Book Characters
During the celebration of National Children’s Book Day (NCBD) on July 21, 2008 in the
Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP), the Philippine Board on Books for Young People (PBBY), after surveying hundreds of public school children all over the country (with the significant help of Sa Aklat Sisikat Foundation), unveiled the 25 Best-Loved Children’s Book Characters Exhibit by Ang Ilustrador ng Kabataan (Ang InK). NCBD is celebrated every third Tuesday of July in commemoration of a little known fact: the publication of Jose Rizal’s retelling and illustration of “The Monkey and the Turtle” in Trubner’s Oriental Record in 1889. The PBBY is an organization committed to the development of children’s literature in the Philippines. It is composed of permanent and institutional members (The National Library, the Cultural Center of the Philippines, and Museo Pambata) and individual members representing educators, researchers, librarians, book reviewers, writers, illustrators, storytellers, publishers, book sellers, media practitioners, and reading advocates. Ang InK is an association of artists committed not only to the creation and promotion of illustrations for children but also the professionalization and development thereof. Sa Aklat Sisikat (SAS) is a non-profit organization that promotes the love and habit of reading among Filipino children.

The subjects of this popular life-size rubber sculpture exhibit and the books they come from are the following:
1. Chenelyn (“Chenelyn! Chenelyn!” written by Rhandee Garlitos, illustrated by Liza Flores, and published by Adarna)
2. Pilo (“Si Pilong Patago-tago” written by Kristine Canon, illustrated by Leo Alvarado, and published by Adarna)
3. Filemon (“Filemon Mamon” written by Christine Bellen, illustrated by Jason Moss, and published by Adarna)
4. Juan (“Juan Tamad” retold by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Jo Ann Bereber, and published by Lampara)
5. Raquel (“Ang Pambihirang Buhok ni Raquel” written by Luis Gatmaitan, illustrated by Beth Parrocha-Doctolero, and published by Adarna)
6. Pilandok (“Pilandok” series of folktales retold by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Kora Albano, and published by Adarna)
7. Pagong at Matsing (“Si Pagong at si Matsing” retold by Danilo Consumido, illustrated by Hubert Fucio, and published by Adarna)
8. Peles (“Ang Kamatis ni Peles” written by Alberta Angeles, illustrated by Renato Gamos, and published by Adarna)
9. Langgam at Tipaklong (“Si Langgam at si Tipaklong” retold by Alberta Angeles, illustrated by Renato Gamos, and published by Adarna)
10. Onyok (“Ang Mahiyaing Manok” written by Rebecca Anonuevo, illustrated by Ruben de Jesus, and published by Adarna)
11. Rosamistica (“Rosamistica” retold by Christine Bellen, illustrated by Liza Flores, and published by Anvil)
12. Kas (“Ang Barumbadong Bus” written by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Jo Ann Bereber, and published by Adarna)
13. Emang Engkantada at ang Tatlong Haragan (“Si Emang Engkantada at ang Tatlong Haragan” written by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Alfonso Onate and Wilfredo Pollarco, and published by Adarna)
14. Pandakotyong (“Si Pandakotyong” retold by Christine Bellen, illustrated by Albert Gamos, and published by Anvil),
15. Mariang Alimango (“Si Mariang Alimango” retold by Tomas Lacson, illustrated by Onie Millare, and published by Adarna)
16. Ampalaya (“Alamat ng Ampalaya” written by Augie Rivera, illustrated by Kora Albano, and published by Adarna)
17. Mariang Sinukuan (“Ang Hukuman ni Sinukuan” retold by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Mitzi Villavecer, and published by Adarna)
18. Og (“Og Uhog” written by Christine Bellen, illustrated by Jason Moss, and published by Lampara)
19. Lola (“Ang Pambihirang Buhok ni Lola” written by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Ibarra Crisostomo, and published by Adarna)
20. Tiktaktok at Pikpakbum (“Tiktaktok at Pikpakbum” written by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Renato Gamos, and published by Adarna)
21. Ibong Adarna (“Ibong Adarna” retold by Roberto Alonzo, Jordan Santos, and published by Adarna)
22. Carancal (“Carancal” series of folktales retold by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Kora Albano, and published by Lampara)
23. Butsiki (“Ang Unang Baboy sa Langit” written by Rene Villanueva, illustrated by Ibarra Crisostomo, and published by Cacho)
24. Duwende (“Ang Parusa ng Duwende” retold by Christine Bellen, illustrated by Elbert Or, and published by Anvil)
25. Teo (“Oh, Mateo” series written by Grace Chong, illustrated by Beth Parrocha-Doctolero, and published by OMF-Hiyas).

Research Question and Methodology

In view of the aforementioned, this paper focuses on this question: Why do Filipino children love these characters? To answer the question, this paper makes a content analysis of the stories using a psycho-educational framework.

4 comments:

Research Methodology said...

Whenever i see the post like your's i feel that there are still helpful people who share information for the help of others, it must be helpful for other's. thanx and good job.
Research Methodology

media templates said...

nice post.keep sharing like this.

Seo Services said...

Thanks for writing such a nice post.
After reading your post I can say that you have done lot of research on this topic and
I really liked the way of your writing and how you have thrown the light on unhidden facts.

earnbangla said...

Thanks for your most informative blog. I got many unknown information from this blog. Excellent information.
ptc

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...