Thursday, March 30, 2006

Our Malaysian Friend

Hermie Salazar, University Librarian of the University of North Eastern Philippines (UNEP)treated us to dinner at Cabalen Megamall. Seated across from me is Mench, a young librarian who works at the Asian Institute of Management (AIM). Beside her is Hermie. And the exotic looking gentleman is none other than Dr. Diljit Singh from the University of Malaya.

cabalen


Dr. Singh has endeared himself to the hearts of many a Filipino librarian and Library organizations. He is here for the 13th CONSAL, although he's made several visits to Manila in the past three years. He's been helping Filipino librarians, school librarians in particular, through the many talks and speaking engagements on Information Literacy, Role of school librarians and libraries, Library Education and ICT applications to library services.

Dr. Singh is affiliated with the International Association of School Libraries (IASL).

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Blogging as Teaching Tool

I am now one of the resource persons listed in the iblog website who will talk about Blogging as Teaching Tool. I still have to improve my outline, so if you have the time, visit my personal blog and be a darling. Answer the questions I posted there, please.

You can post a comment either in this blog or in the other one. You can also email me at zarah@xs.edu.ph or eruannie@yahoo.com.

Thank you!

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

CONSAL XIII and iBlog

It's the height of CONSAL this week. For most of us who are left in our respective libraries, we wonder what's going on at the Shangrila, well, at least, I do. No worries. Aside from the website, Pinoy Librarian Bloggers have begun blogging for the CONSAL XIII. It's where news and updates on the CONSAL can be read and viewed. Day to day programs and events are likewise posted.

Speaking of blogging, there will be a second iBlog summit in April. Check out the iBlog website here.

Saturday, March 25, 2006

Alcala Honorable Winners 2006

If American Children's Literature has the Caldecott Medal
, we have the Alcala Prize. This year, two illustrators will be proclaimed as honorable winners on July 18, 2006 for their work on two of the three honorable winning story of the Salanga Prize.

Jomike Tejido's rendering of Rosario and Her Stories by Ian Casocot.
rosario


Tony Espiritu Santo's (an pseudonym?) study of What Buboy Sees by Mariel Nadal.
alcala 2006 winner_toni_buboy sees


For a list of Caldecott Winners, click this. The American Librarians Association has been awarding the Caldecott Medal and Honorable Winners since 1938. Take note that "librarians" are the ones giving the award. That goes to show that reading, the promotion of it and the development of its culture in homes and at school, is "our" business.

Once the PBBY website is up and going, I'll post a link for the Alcala Prize Winners. The award was named after cartoonist Larry Alcala.

Monday, March 20, 2006

Salaysayan 2006

PBBY is gearing up for NCBD 2006. Along with the annual awarding of the Salanga and Alcala prizes, there will be a nation wide storytelling contest dubbed as Salaysayan 2006.

This early, the Board is busy studying sketches and discussing themes, organizing things and finalizing logistics for the contest. I got to hand it to Ani Alamrio for superbly handling all tasks at the same time. Nolo Silayan is equally amazing with his management skills and leadership role.

This year, NCBD is recognized by DECS as a major event in schools. Have you celebarted NCBD in your school? To whet your apetite, here are wonderful posters by Pepper Roxas ad Ria Henares on the forth coming NCBD and Salaysayan 2006.

Pepper Roxas' style is fun, whimsical and imaginative. Very childlike and so out-of-the-box thinking.

pbby-color-sketch


Ria Henares stuck with tradition. Her lively and vivid use of colors catches the attention of both the young and the young at heart.

PBBY_poster_03[1]_19_06

Storytelling Workshop at The National Library

Promote Reading and Literacy Among Filipino Children Through Storytelling!

Alitaptap Storytellers Philippines the premiere storytelling grou of the country whose mission is to promote literacy through the art of storytelling will conduct

The Acting and Reading Techniques (ART) of Book–Based Storytelling Workshop on March 25 - 26, 2006, Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm at the Executive Lounge, 6th Floor, National Library of the Philippines, T. M. Kalaw Ave., Ermita, Manila, Philippines

Join in as the best storytellers of the country conduct this two-day affair of lecture, exercises and sharing on how to tell stories for children. Then, get a chance to tell your own favorite children’s story after!

Storytelling membership is open only to those who have finished the course.

Workshop Fee: Php. 500. 00 for confirmation and more details, please contact Mario M. Noval at 0917.539.2630 Office no. (02) 535.4689
Email us at alitaptap_storytellers@yahoo.com. Visit our website: www.storytellersphilippines.com

LIMITED SLOTS AVAILABLE!!!

Makinig kayo sa aking kuwento at lakbayin natin ang bagong mundo.

New Stuff

Are you confused with the recent posts I made?

It's all about my term project for one of my MA classes in UP Diliman. I have added another drop-down menu in the left frame of my blog. It's the 6th one that says, FILIPINIANA FOR CHILDREN. It's a compilation of 30 annotated children's books by Filipino Writers which I meant to develop. It includes a Subject and Author Index so users will see its coverage on the topics and writers to the citations.

Why put forth so much effort on this endeavor? Read here and here.

Friday, March 17, 2006

30 Books

Annotated Bibliography

Acacio-Flore, Lin. The Quarreling Kites. Makati City: Tahanan Books, 2000.
Big Kite teaches Little Kite a lesson on humility and brotherhood. Only when Big Kite gets lost did Little Kite appreciate these values.

Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Bisikleta ni Momon. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1997.
Momon’s bike is old and rusty, but it is his prized toy. Learning how to ride the bike gave him bumps and bruises, but it made him value the old bike all the more.

Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Mahiyaing Manok. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.Onyok is a shy rooster who could not crow. To overcome his shyness, his parents gave him all the encouragement he needs. He soon found his voice and his self confidence. The writer’s use of onomatopoeia has been most effective to characterize Onyok and the change in his character.

Anonuevo, Victoria. Ang Paaralan ni Fuwan. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2002.
Fuwan is torn between going to school and helping in the rice field. After being absent for several days from school, he missed his classmates and teachers. Upon his class’ surprise visit, his father realized how important going to school meant for him. Finally, he was allowed to go to school.

Anonuevo, Victoria. Ang Tikbalang Kung Kabilugan ng Buwan. Quezon City:
Adarna House

A tikbalang searches for a nocturnal playmate. Not one enchanted being wanted to play with him until he met his own kind. Written in Filipino and in lyrical poetic form, the story offers aural delight to the listening young learner if read aloud.

Bellen, Christine. Filemon Mamon. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004.
Filemon is bent on losing weight so he can play Andres Bonifacio in the school play. With hard work and discipline, he realized the sacrifices he must take to be physically fit. Bellen’s narrative is simple and funny, but sticks to the real issues on obesity.

Bellen, Christine. Ang Parusa ng Dewende. Pasig City: Anvil Publishing, 2004.
Tias is a lucky boy to have won in a lottery. He is even luckier to have an uncanny friend who protected him from his cruel masters. Retold from the original of Severino Reyes’ Mga Kwento ni Lola Basyang, the rewritten tale is tailored for younger readers.


Bellen, Chritsine. Rosamistica. Pasig City: Anvil Publishing, 2004.
Rosamistica works for her greedy and cruel aunt and uncle. Given a meager allowance for Chritsmas, she donated it to a beggar. Her kindness saw her through a greater reward.

Bersola – Babao, Christine. Bryan Learns A Lesson. Makati City: Goodwill
Bookstore, 2004.
Bryan has everything any boy would want-toys, clothes, food, a yaya who does his biddings. However, he is lazy & ungreateful. In a dream, he lost many things his parents has provided for him.

Canon, Christine. Bakit Matagal Ang Sundo Ko/ Why Is Mommy Late? Quezon
City: Adarna House, 2001.
A little girl patiently waits for mom to fetch her after school. When all the kids have gone home, she resolved to imagine the possible reasons why her mother is late in fetching her. And what imagination can do on a bored little child.

Chong, Grace. Teo’s Trash. Mandaluyong City: OMF Literature, 2003.
What is old can be made new and what is new can be beautifully old and rare. In this story, Chong explores the natural curiosity present in all children through her favorite character, Teo. His fondness for old things earned him a feature in a TV show.

Eusebio-Abad, Heidi Emily. Polliwog’s Wiggle. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004.
Polliwog is worried of growing up because he might lose his friend, Minnow.

Evasco, Eugene. Hilong Talilong. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2005.
A loving aunt helped her nephew survive ADHD.

Evasco, Eugene. Apat na Mata. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2005.
A little boy had trouble seeing the (real) beauty of the world. Thanks to a new pair of glasses, he could see clearly & appreciate his sense of sight.

Fernandez, Regina. Celia Studious & Conrad Cat. Quezon City: Adarna House,
2002
.

Conrad the cat tries his best to influence Celia into not attending school day after day. But, Celia won’t give in. Finally, she told Conrad all the wonderful things & fun activities she does in school.

Flores-Garcia, Annette. I Want My Yaya. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2002.
Blesilda’s yaya left her & she had to deal with different yayas with strange habits. Eventually, she learned how to take care of herself.

Gatmaitan, Luis. Si Miyaw Kasi. Makati City: UNICEF, 2002.
Nancy takes care of cat foundlings while her parents are away. What her parents could not provide her, she gave he foundlings.

Hermosa, Nemah. Uldok: The War Hero. Quezon City: LG & M, 2005.
Set in World War II Philippines, a family hid in the mountains for safety. They left their pet dog to guard their house in the village in case Japanese soldiers come to look for them. One visit to their house after months in hiding led them to a depressing discovery.

Ibardolaza, Honoel. The Greediest of Rajas & The Whitest of Clouds. Quezon
City: Adarna House, 2004.

Greed has pushed the Rajah to the height of corruption. Greed drove him to his own demise.

Lalunio,Lydia. Si Munting Uod. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2003.
Little caterpillar eats a lot to turn into a beautiful butterfly.

Pacis, Carla. Hipon and Biya. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004
Hipon and Biya are friends. They share a home in a little coral among the coral reefs. What Hipon can’t do, Biya is there to help out and vice-versa. A well written concept story on symbiosis, the writer’s knowledge of subject matter reflects the thorough research that went through in producing such an insightful tale.

Patindol, Jean. Papa’s House, Mama’s House. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004.
Mama explains, with patience, compassion & tolerance, the reasons for her separation from Papa. Using not too complicated words for a child to understand.

Rivera, Augie. XILEF. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.
Felix is a young boy afflicted with dyslexia. Through the support of his parents & his teachers’ commitment to teach him, he eventually learned how to read & earned his self-esteem.

Rizal, Jose P. The Monkey and The Turtle: A Philippine Folk Tale. Makati City:
Tahanan Books for Young People, 2003.

Monkey tries outsmarting Turtle. Apparently, Turtle is too smart to be tricked.

Rivera, Augie. Si Jhun-Jhun Noong Bago Ideklara Ang Batas Militar. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2001.


Jhun-Jhun grew up all too soon upon his older brother’s involvement with rallies before the martial law years.

Suplico, Ma. Teresa. Dalawang Puyo. Quezon City: JMC Press, 2001.
Having two cowlicks can be unlucky? Or so old people believed. A little boy ruminates the meaning of having two cowlicks instead of one.

Tejido, Jose Miguel. Ang Pambihirang Sombrero: The Amazing Hat. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2003.

Min’s creativity leads her to wonderful encounters with people in her community. Thanks to an old hat that served as her inspiration.

Unson, Ricardo. Bahay Ng Marami’t Masasayang Tinig. Quezon City: Adarna
House, 2002.

Palasia heard happy voices in a small house while working away from the market place. Intrigued, she and her brother observed the activities and were soon invited by the school teacher.

Villanueva, Rene. Ang Barumbadong Bus. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1999.Kas, a speedy bus, is an allegory for the careless and insensitive driver. He does not observe traffic rules and disobeys safety precautions. This uncouth behavior led to an accident that Kas could never undo.

Villanueva, Rene. The Zimbragatzees of the Planet Zing. Quezon City: Lampara
Books, 2002

The Zimbragatzees lost their fantastic noises due to pollution and environmental decay.

Anotated Bibliography (Work in Progress)

ANIMAL HABITAT

Pacis, Carla. Hipon and Biya. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004

Hipon and Biya are friends. They share a home in a little coral among the coral reefs. What Hipon can’t do, Biya is there to help out and vice-versa. A well written concept story on symbiosis, the writer’s knowledge of subject matter reflects the thorough research that went through in producing such an insightful tale.


ANTIQUES

Chong, Grace. Teo’s Trash. Mandaluyong City: OMF Literature, 2003.

What is old can be made new and what is new can be beautifully old and rare. In this story, Chong explores the natural curiosity present in all children through her favorite character, Teo. His fondness for old things earned him a feature in a TV show.

A.D.H.D.

Evasco, Eugene. Hilong Talilong. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2005.

A loving aunt helped her nephew survive ADHD.

BICYCLE

Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Bisikleta ni Momon. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1997.

Momon’s bike is old and rusty, but it is his prized toy. Learning how to ride the bike gave him bumps and bruises, but it made him value the old bike all the more.

BUTTERFLY

Lalunio,Lydia. Si Munting Uod. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2003.

Little caterpillar eats a lot to turn into a beautiful butterfly.

CARE GIVER

CATS

CHRISTMAS




COMMUNITY HELPERS

Tejido, Jose Miguel. Ang Pambihirang Sombrero: The Amazing Hat. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2003.

Min’s creativity leads her to wonderful encounters with people in her community. Thanks to an old hat that served as her inspiration.

COMPETITION

CORRUPTION
Ibardolaza, Honoel. The Greediest of Rajas & The Whitest of Clouds. Quezon
City: Adarna House, 2004.

Greed has pushed the Rajah to the height of corruption. Greed drove him to his own demise.

CREATIVITY
Tejido, Jose Miguel. Ang Pambihirang Sombrero: The Amazing Hat. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2003.

Mia’s creativity leads her to wonderful encounters with people in her community. Thanks to an old hat that served as her inspiration.

DISCIPLINE

DIVORCE
Patindol, Jean. Papa’s House, Mama’s House. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004.

Mama explains, with patience, compassion & tolerance, the reasons for her separation from Papa. Using not too complicated words for a child to understand.

DOGS
Hermosa, Nemah. Uldok: The War Hero. Quezon City: LG & M, 2005.

Set in World War II Philippines, a family hid in the mountains for safety. They left their pet dog to guard their house in the village in case Japanese soldiers come to look for them. One visit to their house after months in hiding led them to a depressing discovery.

DREAMS
Bersola – Babao, Christine. Bryan Learns A Lesson. Makati City: Goodwill
Bookstore, 2004.

Bryan has everything any boy would want-toys, clothes, food, a yaya who does his biddings. However, he is lazy & ungreateful. In a dream, he lost many things his parents has provided for him.

DWARFS

DYSLEXIA
Rivera, Augie. XILEF. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.

Felix is a young boy afflicted with dyslexia. Through the support of his parents & his teachers’ commitment to teach him, he eventually learned how to read & earned his self-esteem.

EATING HABITS

ENCHANTED CREATURES

ETHNIC GROUPS – BADJAO
Unson, Ricardo. Bahay Ng Marami’t Masasayang Tinig. Quezon City: Adarna
House, 2002.

Palasia heard happy voices in a small house while working away from the market place. Intrigued, she and her brother observed the activities and were soon invited by the school teacher.

ETHNIC GROUPS – BONTOC

EYES

Evasco, Eugene. Apat na Mata. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2005.

A little boy had trouble seeing the (real) beauty of the world. Thanks to a new pair of glasses, he could see clearly & appreciate his sense of sight.



FAMILY
Acacio-Flore, Lin. The Quarreling Kites. Makati City: Tahanan Books, 2000.

Big Kite teaches Little Kite a lesson on humility and brotherhood. Only when Big Kite gets lost did Little Kite appreciate these values.

Anonuevo, Victoria. Ang Paaralan ni Fuwan. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2002.

Fuwan is torn between going to school and helping in the rice field. After being absent for several days from school, he missed his classmates and teachers. Upon his class’ surprise visit, his father realized how important going to school meant for him. Finally, he was allowed to go to school.

Suplico, Ma. Teresa. Dalawang Puyo. Quezon City: JMC Press, 2001.

Having two cowlicks can be unlucky? Or so old people believed. A little boy ruminates the meaning of having two cowlicks instead of one.

FISH

FROGS

FRUITS

Lalunio,Lydia. Si Munting Uod. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2003.

Little caterpillar eats a lot to turn into a beautiful butterfly.

GREED

Bersola – Babao, Christine. Bryan Learns A Lesson. Makati City: Goodwill
Bookstore, 2004.

Bryan has everything any boy would want-toys, clothes, food, a yaya who does his biddings. However, he is lazy & ungreateful. In a dream, he lost many things his parents has provided for him.

Ibardolaza, Honoel. The Greediest of Rajas & The Whitest of Clouds. Quezon
City: Adarna House, 2004.

Greed has pushed the Rajah to the height of corruption. Greed drove him to his own demise.


HANDICAPPED

Rivera, Augie. XILEF. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.

Felix is a young boy afflicted with dyslexia. Through the support of his parents & his teachers’ commitment to teach him, he eventually learned how to read & earned his self-esteem.

HAT

Tejido, Jose Miguel. Ang Pambihirang Sombrero: The Amazing Hat. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2003.

Mia’s creativity leads her to wonderful encounters with people in her community. Thanks to an old hat that served as her inspiration.

HEALTH HYGIENE

IMAGINATION

INDEPENDENCE

KINDNESS

KITE
Acacio-Flore, Lin. The Quarreling Kites. Makati City: Tahanan Books, 2000.

Big Kite teaches Little Kite a lesson on humility and brotherhood. Only when Big Kite gets lost did Little Kite appreciate these values.

Ibardolaza, Honoel. The Greediest of Rajas & The Whitest of Clouds. Quezon
City: Adarna House, 2004.

Greed has pushed the Rajah to the height of corruption. Greed drove him to his own demise.

LOYALTY

Hermosa, Nemah. Uldok: The War Hero. Quezon City: LG & M, 2005.

Set in World War II Philippines, a family hid in the mountains for safety. They left their pet dog to guard their house in the village in case Japanese soldiers come to look for them. One visit to their house after months in hiding led them to a depressing discovery.

MANNERS

Villanueva, Rene. Ang Barumbadong Bus. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1999.

Kas, a speedy bus, is an allegory for the careless and insensitive driver. He does not observe traffic rules and disobeys safety precautions. This uncouth behavior led to an accident that Kas could never undo.

MARTIAL LAW

Rivera, Augie. Si Jhun-Jhun Noong Bago Ideklara Ang Batas Militar. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2001.

Jhun-Jhun grew up all too soon upon his older brother’s involvement with rallies before the martial law years.

METAMORPHOSIS

Lalunio,Lydia. Si Munting Uod. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2003.

Little caterpillar eats a lot to turn into a beautiful butterfly.

MONEY

NOSE

NUMBERS

Lalunio,Lydia. Si Munting Uod. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2003.

Little caterpillar eats a lot to turn into a beautiful butterfly.

PARENTING

Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Mahiyaing Manok. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.

Onyok is a shy rooster who could not crow. To overcome his shyness, his parents gave him all the encouragement he needs. He soon found his voice and his self confidence. The writer’s use of onomatopoeia has been most effective to characterize Onyok and the change in his character.

Bersola – Babao, Christine. Bryan Learns A Lesson. Makati City: Goodwill
Bookstore, 2004.

Bryan has everything any boy would want-toys, clothes, food, a yaya who does his biddings. However, he is lazy & ungreateful. In a dream, he lost many things his parents has provided for him.

Gatmaitan, Luis. Si Miyaw Kasi. Makati City: UNICEF, 2002.

Nancy takes care of cat foundlings while her parents are away. What her parents could not provide her, she gave he foundlings.


Patindol, Jean. Papa’s House, Mama’s House. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004.

Mama explains, with patience, compassion & tolerance, the reasons for her separation from Papa. Using not too complicated words for a child to understand.


Rivera, Augie. XILEF. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.

Felix is a young boy afflicted with dyslexia. Through the support of his parents & his teachers’ commitment to teach him, he eventually learned how to read & earned his self-esteem.

PERSEVERANCE
Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Bisikleta ni Momon. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1997.

Momon’s bike is old and rusty, but it is his prized toy. Learning how to ride the bike gave him bumps and bruises, but it made him value the old bike all the more.


PETS

Hermosa, Nemah. Uldok: The War Hero. Quezon City: LG & M, 2005.

Set in World War II Philippines, a family hid in the mountains for safety. They left their pet dog to guard their house in the village in case Japanese soldiers come to look for them. One visit to their house after months in hiding led them to a depressing discovery.


PHILIPPINE FOLKLORE
Rizal, Jose P. The Monkey and The Turtle: A Philippine Folk Tale. Makati City:
Tahanan Books for Young People, 2003.

Monkey tries outsmarting Turtle. Apparently, Turtle is too smart to be tricked.

PHILIPPINE HISTORY
Hermosa, Nemah. Uldok: The War Hero. Quezon City: LG & M, 2005.

Set in World War II Philippines, a family hid in the mountains for safety. They left their pet dog to guard their house in the village in case Japanese soldiers come to look for them. One visit to their house after months in hiding led them to a depressing discovery.

Rivera, Augie. Si Jhun-Jhun Noong Bago Ideklara Ang Batas Militar. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2001.

Jhun-Jhun grew up all too soon upon his older brother’s involvement with rallies before the martial law years.

PHYSICAL FITNESS

POLLUTION
Villanueva, Rene. The Zimbragatzees of the Planet Zing. Quezon City: Lampara
Books, 2002

The Zimbragatzees lost their fantastic noises due to pollution and environmental decay.

RECYCLING

RIGHTS OF THE CHILD

Anonuevo, Victoria. Ang Paaralan ni Fuwan. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2002.

Fuwan is torn between going to school and helping in the rice field. After being absent for several days from school, he missed his classmates and teachers. Upon his class’ surprise visit, his father realized how important going to school meant for him. Finally, he was allowed to go to school.

Rivera, Augie. Si Jhun-Jhun Noong Bago Ideklara Ang Batas Militar. Quezon City:
Adarna House, 2001.

Jhun-Jhun grew up all too soon upon his older brother’s involvement with rallies before the martial law years.



ROAD SAFETY

Villanueva, Rene. Ang Barumbadong Bus. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1999.

Kas, a speedy bus, is an allegory for the careless and insensitive driver. He does not observe traffic rules and disobeys safety precautions. This uncouth behavior led to an accident that Kas could never undo.


ROOSTER
Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Mahiyaing Manok. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.

Onyok is a shy rooster who could not crow. To overcome his shyness, his parents gave him all the encouragement he needs. He soon found his voice and his self confidence. The writer’s use of onomatopoeia has been most effective to characterize Onyok and the change in his character.

SCHOOL
Anonuevo, Victoria. Ang Paaralan ni Fuwan. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2002.

Fuwan is torn between going to school and helping in the rice field. After being absent for several days from school, he missed his classmates and teachers. Upon his class’ surprise visit, his father realized how important going to school meant for him. Finally, he was allowed to go to school.


SELF CONFIDENCE
Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Mahiyaing Manok. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2000.

Onyok is a shy rooster who could not crow. To overcome his shyness, his parents gave him all the encouragement he needs. He soon found his voice and his self confidence. The writer’s use of onomatopoeia has been most effective to characterize Onyok and the change in his character.


SENSE OF SIGHT

Evasco, Eugene. Apat na Mata. Quezon City: LG & M Corporation, 2005.

A little boy had trouble seeing the (real) beauty of the world. Thanks to a new pair of glasses, he could see clearly & appreciate his sense of sight.



SENSE OF SMELL

Villanueva, Rene. The Zimbragatzees of the Planet Zing. Quezon City: Lampara
Books, 2002

The Zimbragatzees lost their fantastic noises due to pollution and environmental decay.

SEPARATION
Patindol, Jean. Papa’s House, Mama’s House. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2004.

Mama explains, with patience, compassion & tolerance, the reasons for her separation from Papa. Using not too complicated words for a child to understand.


SPIRITS

STRENGTH OF CHARACTER

STUDYING

SUPERSTITIOUS BELIEFS

Suplico, Ma. Teresa. Dalawang Puyo. Quezon City: JMC Press, 2001.

Having two cowlicks can be unlucky? Or so old people believed. A little boy ruminates the meaning of having two cowlicks instead of one.


TEACHER
Anonuevo, Victoria. Ang Paaralan ni Fuwan. Quezon City: Adarna House, 2002.

Fuwan is torn between going to school and helping in the rice field. After being absent for several days from school, he missed his classmates and teachers. Upon his class’ surprise visit, his father realized how important going to school meant for him. Finally, he was allowed to go to school.

TOYS
Anonuevo, Rebecca. Ang Bisikleta ni Momon. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1997.

Momon’s bike is old and rusty, but it is his prized toy. Learning how to ride the bike gave him bumps and bruises, but it made him value the old bike all the more.


TRANSPORTATION

Villanueva, Rene. Ang Barumbadong Bus. Quezon City: Adarna House, 1999.

Kas, a speedy bus, is an allegory for the careless and insensitive driver. He does not observe traffic rules and disobeys safety precautions. This uncouth behavior led to an accident that Kas could never undo.

TRICKSTER TALE

Rizal, Jose P. The Monkey and The Turtle: A Philippine Folk Tale. Makati City:
Tahanan Books for Young People, 2003.

Monkey tries outsmarting Turtle. Apparently, Turtle is too smart to be tricked.

Coverage and Background of the Project

III. Coverage

The books included in the bibliography were acquired during the school year 2004 - 2005 and 2005 - 2006 by the Xavier Grade School LRC. There were only twenty Filipiniana Children's story books identified as acquired and cataloged in the school year 2005 - 2006. The list of acquired books for school year 2004-2005 is currently not available since it is being counterchecked. To add more titles to the bibliography, suggestions from the librarians were solicited. An additional ten titles were included in the first thirty annotations.

This, however, is not solely a term project but also a work in progress for the Filipiniana Collection of the Xavier Grade School Learning Resource Center.

IV. Background of the Project

The project was inspired by the queries of teachers for books to be used in instruction. Since they are using the Literature Based Approach in teaching reading and language arts skills, they need more trade books. There are plenty foreign books to choose from but little is known from the growing produce of Filipiniana for children.

Since the GS LRC supports the academic program of the school and operates on a resource based program, this annotated bibliography shall greatly help teachers in instruction, likewise, the translation of the school's academic goals.

V. Design

The bibliography shall be arranged alphabetically by subject and author.

VI. Tools

Sear's List of Subject Headings; Xavier Grade School Subject Matter Guide for Reading, Language Arts, Filipino and Aralin Panlipunan

Filipiniana for Children - Author Index

A
Acacio-Flore, Lin
Anonuevo, Rebeca
Anonuevo, Victoria

B
Bellen, Christine
Bersola – Babao, Christine

C
Canon, Christine
Chong, Grace

E
Eusebio-Abad, Heidi
Evasco, Eugene

F
Fernandez, Regina
Flores-Garcia, Annette

G
Gatmaitan, Luis

H
Hermosa, Nemah

I
Ibardolaza, Honoel

L
Lalunio,Lydia

P
Pacis, Carla
Patindol, Jean

R
Rivera, Augie
Rizal, Jose

S
Suplicio, Ma. Teresa

T
Tejido, Jomike

U
Unson, Ricardo

V
Villanueva, Rene

An Annotated Bibliography of Filipiniana for Children

This is my term project for my graduate course, LIS 261 - Information Analysis at the Institute of Library and Information Science. I have enitled it as An Annotated Bibliography of Filipiniana for Children. Read on further to know more about the bibliography.

I. Rationale

There is a steady, if not rapid, growth of Filipiniana books for children published every year. Most of these books were written for readers in the preschool and elementary grades. A good number of these books carry relevant themes that address developmental needs and support curricular offerings. Furthermore, these books promote Filipino values, culture and heritage. Indeed, books, particularly the ones written for them, are essential to children’s learning and improvement.

While foreign children’s books abound in the market and are, likewise, widely used by teachers for instruction, Filipiniana children’s books are marginalized. Teachers have yet to discover the potentials of these resources for instructional use given their aesthetic, literary and cultural values.

School libraries for their part are responsible for developing, organizing and maintaining a collection that is suitable for children and the appropriate pedagogy. Manual and online catalogs exist, however, tools like indexes and bibliographies are helpful tools for teachers who have specific needs for books that can enrich instruction. Since the school library provides opportunities for resource-based learning, such catalogs are not enough to lead teachers to a wide array of relevant learning resources. Time is also a factor to consider in their search for materials because preparation in planning a lesson is another time consuming task.

Thus, this annotated bibliography of Filipiniana Children’s Books.

Lastly, this bibliography may serve as springboard for promotional activities that school librarians and other advocates of literacy.

II. Relevance

On a larger scale, this shall initially serve as guide for parents who are keen on developing in their children a genuine love for books and reading through Filipiniana materials. Writers of children’s stories may find this bibliography a useful directory of published materials that inform them of the themes and subjects already written about. It can be a valuable reference source for researchers on Philipine Children’s Literature who are developing scholastic writings on the subject. Guidance counselors in need of titles for bibliotherapy shall benefit from this likewise.

Filipiniana For Children - Subject Index

A
ANIMAL HABITAT
ANTIQUES
ADHD

B
BICYCLE
BUTTERFLY

C
CARE GIVER
CATS
CHRISTMAS
COMMUNITY HELPERS
COMPETITION
CORRUPTION
CREATIVITY

D
DISCIPLINE
DIVORCE
DOGS
DREAMS
DWARFS
DYSLEXIA

E
EATING HABITS
ENCHANTED CREATURES
ETHNIC GROUPS – BADJAO
ETHNIC GROUPS – BONTOC
EYES

F
FAMILY
FISH
FROGS
FRUITS

G
GREED

H
HANDICAPPED
HAT
HEALTH HYGIENE

I
IMAGINATION
INDEPENDENCE

K
KINDNESS
KITE

L
LOYALTY

M
MANNERS
MARTIAL LAW
METAMORPHOSIS
MONEY

N
NOSE
NUMBERS

O
OBESITY

P
PARENTING
PERSEVERANCE
PETS
PHILIPPINE FOLKLORE
PHILIPPINE HISTORY
PHYSICAL FITNESS
POLLUTION

R
RECYCLING
RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
ROAD SAFETY
ROOSTER

S
SCHOOL
SELF CONFIDENCE
SENSE OF SIGHT
SENSE OF SMELL
SEPARATION
SPIRITS
STUDYING
SUPERSTITIOUS BELIEFS

T
TOYS
TRANSPORTATION
TRICKSTER TALE

The Busy Librarian

It's the end of the school year and things at home, at work and in grad school are all piling up on top of the other. I have several posts put aside and they won't see the light until after this weekend. So please bear with me as I try my best to accomplish my requirements, year end reports and inventory, and motherly duties.

Tuesday, March 7, 2006

More on Philosophy and Paradigm

During the dalmatian-librarian controversy, I have written about two school's of thought pervading Philipipne librarianship today. This was only an observation and I wished to express my opinion via blogging but so far, no one has yet commented. My point is, the plans, decisions and actions that librarians make are dependent on his or her philosophy. This includes the education and life experiences that shaped him or her.

If a school librarian believes that his or her role in the school is confined to library work alone, limiting services and functions to the four walls of the library, school administrators will perceive them as auxiliary personnel and not as collaborators to teachers nor professionals who can make great contributions to the academic program of the school.

When I hear complains and sentiments of school librarians that they are being treated as "second class" citizens in their school community; that they are not getting the support they deserve; that the library is the last priority; I ask them what solutions they've done so far. It is not easy to prove and substantiate the library's worth, but it has to be done. A non-librarian may have the impression that libraries are important in a school and so are the staff and librarians who run programs and services, however, these people are very few.

To change the perception of non-supporters, school librarians need to change philosophy and paradigms if necessary. This is not to say that things learned in library school must be forgotten. What I mean is for school librarians to initiate the change themselves vis-a-vis the evolving environment. There will be mistakes along the way and it will be tough battling one's own demons. It is worth the risk, however, and with careful reflection, study and planning, it might work. What else do I wish to impart? I have five thinking points to consider and mull over.

1. Readiness and Preparation. Do you welcome a change in mind fame? A renewal? A revamping of time tested processes? If you are, you need to prepare yourself - emotionally, psychologically, professionally and POLITICALLY. There are skills that must be learned, relearned and unlearned. Play on your strengths. Find solutions to problems and weaknesses.

2. Support. I mean people, and not just technology. It is an advantage if you are adept at investing on technology and nurturing relationships. I have known a gifted few who can do both. We can learn form their example.

3. Sustainability. How can you keep yourself motivated once you start revving up your school library? How do you keep others motivated? It can be a tiring task, so expect this to happen.

4. Systematize. Look with in the system and outside of it. Network your way and connect with other systems who can help your school library. It is a key to survival.

5. Stay healthy. Smile a lot. Laugh. At your mistakes. On good work accomplished.

Easier said than done? You will never know unless you begin.

Thursday, March 2, 2006

Perceptions, Philosophy and Paradigms

As a take off from my post last February 27, 2006, I wrote about school libraries falling under Student Services or the Academic Program. I find it odd when school libraries affirm their role as the hub of the school and to articulate their goals, objectives and functions as supporting and supplementing the curriculum when all the while falling under Student Services. It does not sound as auxiliary nor ancillary services to me. This gives me the impression that the school administration perceives the school library quite differently the way the school librarian does.

This is a common scenario among schools. Although what I am recounting are not based on research, I have enough experience as accreditor and trainer-facilitator to claim such realities.

The success of school libraries can be dictated by the way the school principal, director or directress perceives the school library. If the school library is seen as a repository of books and resources, its functions reduced to clerical and technical tasks then, it does belong to Student Services. Is this wrong? No. However, the school library's potential to affect teachers and impact student learning is diminished. Who is at the losing end? The students and their parents who send their kids to school.

With the resources and the technology available today, teachers can do so many things with them for better delivery of instruction. Students can be provided with other modes of learning that cater to their learning styles through these different learning gadgets and varied resources in the classroom and outside of it, like, the school library! Many a school, and mostly, private schools for this matter only want the best for their students and teachers. Its administrators assess, review and reform the curriculum. Top level administrators are very much involved, definitely, but school librarians rarely are given the opportunity to bring in their expertise, knowledge and academic training. I'm not blaming the administration because, they are not aware of the school library's potential to impact instruction.

It is now the responsibility of the school librarian to let "them" know. School librarians have long recognized their important role in academic and formative programs of the school. But how to communicate this to their superiors is another matter. We're treading on library management issues here and this is one weak area of Philippine library education (I won't mind if you challenge this statement, but if you do, I'll try to post proofs based on research. Just take note that we're talking about school librarianship in particular).

First, it is necessary for school librarians to look into their own philosophy of school library services. This philosophy is of course, influenced by their training in library school. Second, they, we for this matter, must study the existing paradigms on implementing school library programs. It would also help if research on trends and current movements in school library services are taken into consideration.

(To be continued...)